Home General News Huawei: launches MateBooks in china with Linux pre installed

-

Huawei: launches MateBooks in china with Linux pre installed

In spite of the trade blacklisting of Huawei by the United States’ government, the Chinese electronics company’s notebook division is plugging along, in spite of the reports of component order cancellations in the month of June, prompting concern that they could come out of the PC OEM market.

Huawei is now selling the Matebook 13, Matebook 14, and Matebook X Pro at the VMALL, Huawei’s e-commerce place of the market in China, with Deepin Linux installed in advance. Deepin is a domestic distribution in China, along with their own desktop environment—appropriately also known as Deepin—called as the single most amazing desktop on the market by the TechRepublic’s Jack Wallen.

Huawei: launches MateBooks in china  with Linux pre installed

Huawei is passing forward the savings to consumers also, with the Matebook 13 and 14 models getting a 300 yuan ($42 USD) price cut, although the Linux version of the MateBook X Pro is priced at 600 yuan ($84) higher. This rating should be considered temporary, as the products are displayed on VMALL, though only let users to be notified when they are stored in stock.

There is a probability that Huawei may lose the ability to buy Windows licenses from Microsoft because of their placement on the “entity list,” obstructing companies dealing in United States-origin technology from conducting business along with Huawei, constituting an effective blacklisting by the United States government.

The sales of Linux PC’s to the customers by Huawei, and generally could come out in better driver support for fingerprint readers and other hardware with no consistent Linux support.

Huawei’s MateBook items are available outside of China, although Huawei has made no declaration of making Linux versions to be available in the West. The Matebook series is consumed positively by the reviewers, though—as it is practically the problem for the entire PC industry, to some limit—the products follow Apple’s design footsteps closely.

What's More