Babies grows With lizard-like hands in womb shedding them before birth- Finds Study

0
328
Babies grows With lizard-like hands in womb shedding them before birth- Finds Study
Babies grows With lizard-like hands in womb shedding them before birth- Finds Study

Babies grow With lizard-like hands in womb shedding them before birth. In the womb, humans infants who are developing, grow the additional muscles in their hands and also feet that later become invisible or rather disappear, without a trace, scientists have found out.

The short terms tissues, the researchers discovered, maybe leftovers from our evolutionary predecessors.

The yet unknown muscles can be spotted in limbed animals with more intricate digits than ours, explained study co-author Rui Diogo, an evolutionary biologist and hominid paleobiologist at the Howard University in Washington, D.C. Lot of the muscles crop up in lizards, which can be seen with mammoth wiggly toes, while a couple of them can be seen in mammals like chimpanzees, known for their flexible feet.

See also:  Newly Found Structures in Tooth Enamel Might Finally Explain Its Bizarre Strength

However, our species, the tissues tend to fuse to other muscles or drift away to nothing before birth, revealed the small study, published Oct. 1 in the journal Development.

Babies grows With lizard-like hands in womb shedding them before birth- Finds Study
Babies grow With lizard-like hands in womb shedding them before birth- Finds Study

The authors have suggested that some of the transient muscles may have disappeared from our adult predecessors more than 250 million years ago, as mammals started to develop from mammal-like reptiles.

The study’s same size is extremely small. Therefore, it remains to be seen whether these muscles will be appearing in all the human embryos and what that may mean for the history of human evolution.

“The central thought of this whole process is this idea that we have sub-muscles that are just smooth, and then they are gone,” said Alain Chédotal, a neuroscientist and also a developmental biologist at the Pierre and Marie Curie University in the country Paris, who was not part of the work.

READ  Virginia Stille- A Houston singer competes to be 'Queen of the Song'

The study needs to yield the same results on a larger scale before we can make any permanent conclusions.

Chédotal stressed, but the preliminary results indicate interesting questions about prenatal development.

Also Read: Ancient Sports Fan’s Skeleton and Head-Shaped Jar Founded: Here’s everything you want to know

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here