Top 6 Places to Move in the Age of COVID-19

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places to move

If you want to succeed in life, then you always need to be ahead of the curve. And if you’re looking for somewhere to live that will put you ahead of the curve, there are a few factors you need to consider. Let’s take a look at those factors prior to revealing the six best cities to move to in the COVID-19 era.

  1. Low Population Density
  2. Spaciousness
  3. Car Travel
  4. Ample Access to Single-Family Housing
  5. High-Paying Jobs
  6. Educated Workforce

These six key factors will lead you to the locations with the highest potential for quality of life in the near future. The low population density is important because it means people aren’t in close proximity with one another as much as they are in New York City, Chicago, Houston, or other major cities. This goes hand-in-hand with spaciousness. More car travel also means not being too close to others on a consistent basis. There is a reason New York has suffered worse than any other state from COVID-19, which is consistent close proximity to others. Ample access to single-family housing, high-paying jobs, and an educated workforce are all economic drivers that were already in place.

When considering where to move, it is important to consider those factors, and do your research on some of the better locations to move during the age of COVID-19.

San Jose, California

San Jose is known for technological innovation, sprawling campuses, climate, and affluence. If you put all those factors together, you have a clear winner. There are also 5,686 people per square mile, which is low for the 10th largest city in the United States.

The only problem with living in San Jose is that it’s extremely expensive. If you can afford it, or if you landed a high-paying job in or near San Jose, go for it. Otherwise, you’re going to be living under financial strain, and that is never an enjoyable experience.

Raleigh, North Carolina

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Raleigh is best known for its Research Triangle Park, which is otherwise known as RTP to locals. The Research Triangle Park combines Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. Raleigh itself is also known as the City of Oaks because of the oak trees that line the streets. You will definitely find beauty here. Additionally, you will find more car travel than foot travel, and the population density is 2,963 people per square feet. The climate here is superb, the prices are affordable, and you won’t be far from the beach, the mountains, or Charlotte.

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City is known for The Great Salt Lake, the 500 inches of snow that fall on the mountains every year, and mining. That’s about it. But that’s a good thing because it’s still early in its growth stage. It’s currently the 127th largest city in the United States, which makes it not very large at all. The population density is only 1,722 people per square mile.

Tucson, Arizona

Tucson is known for its performing arts, galleries and museums, multicultural heritage, and a lot of cacti. It’s the ideal city if you’re seeking a dry climate plus a great option to get ahead of COVID-19. The population density for Tucson is 2,327 people per square mile.

Denver, Colorado

Denver offers a perfect blend of urban sophistication and outdoor adventure. You will also find a lively music scene, cultural attractions, craft breweries, and fine dining. You can’t do all of this now, but it will all come back. In the meantime, Denver has a population density of 4,789 people per square mile, which is high for this list but low overall. For instance, New York City has a population density of 28,317 people per square mile.

Boise, Idaho

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Boise is known for its friendly people, low crime rate, and affordable living. It’s also seen as the best city for mountain biking in the United States. Boise has a population density of 2,667 people per square mile, making Boise an excellent overall option for someone starting out.

Now you know the six best cities for the COVID-19 era. Prior to moving, consider all factors, not just COVID-19. 

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